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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)
their roovs two days after sandy, in scenes reminiscent of katrina. also reports of a desperate search for two children, swept away from their mom in the storm surge. and then word that the death toll had nearly doubled to 14. it was becoming clear that staten island, a sleepy enclave best known as the name sake for the famous staten island ferry, was a world away from the rest of this city which today was getting moving again. so, we hopped in the car outside of our office in manhattan, expecting a journey that would be made very difficult by the city's maddening post-storm grid lock. instead, the real problems became getting gas. we drove around northern new jersey for hours encountering lines and frustrated people. >> aggravating. that storm did its thing. knocked out everything. >> reporter: we were only saved by some relatives of one of our colleagues who brought us a two-gallon jug of gas. >> just keep it. >> reporter: it's okay. finally, we arrived. and look at what we saw next from our window. >> the transformer blew up and took the whole store down. that's my open sign to the store. i
was not sufficient with all the traumas from katrina and manmade traumas, we have not thought about what we need to do to protect ourselves from these natural and unnatural attacks. hopefully this is what this wake-up call will do for us. >> well certainly they won't be leaving major equipment in basements. major mris were down underwater. they were pumping it out and it's all saltwater, which is very destructive. it will be millions of dollars. >> eliot: and saltwater is enormously destructive. that's part of what caused the con ed transformers to blow up. i'm worried about what it will take to rebuild this infrastructure. that makes the case. cost will be vast. >> you can see the gridlock that we're experiencing. if you try to move through manhattan it takes you hours. it shows how dependent we really are on the subway system. we have to get it up and running. our hospitals functioning again. it's a huge challenge. i've never seen the federal state and city government work more more hormonously. and the president just said, i'm telling everyone to get back to them in 15 minutes. i can get ever
katrina. he says relief money was spent on bags and massage parlors. one of the things we thought you should know. but first, today nate silver of "the new york times" forecasted president obama had 77% chance of winning re-election and now 299 votes and governor romney 239. >>> welcome back. president obama was supposed to be in ohio today before canceling the visit due to hurricane sandy and the damage caused. despite being off the trail, the latest poll of ohio voters gives the president a five-point edge and seems to show growing optimism about the economy of white working class voters and could be the reason seeing him hold on to the lead and, quote, if you look at the body language of the campaign hard not to conclude they believe they're behind. and if they believe ohio is a be all end all then they're behind. let's bring in editor mark murray. before we talk about the poll, i want to play what vice president joe biden said regarding this car ad or auto ad running brought to you by the romney campaign and called misleading and slammed by gm and chrysler. let me play it. >> they
a comparison with hurricane katrina. i want to use it as an analogy. but the analogy here that might be helpful, we think back to katrina and what that meant to us as a nation. we very rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm. right now we are in the aftermath period of this superstorm, sandy. how do you feel in terms of dealing with the aftermath, describing those explosions, these ongoing worries. before we get to rebuilding, rescuing people, taking care of continuing damage right now. how would you assess the response and the coordination between the federal government, the state government, municipalities. how are we doing? >> i think we're doing very well. i mean, you heard the president, and i have to say that i think his response has been terrific, really. and it's been coordinated, unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard, you know, governor christie, who's a republican, with president obama, working together. and that's how it's been, from the president to the governor, all the way down to the county and the towns. so one of the things that i di
oceanic and not mr. association, the costliest storms to hit katrina by one at funk shot. take, about 30 billion. andrew in 90 to about 36.5 billion. wilma in 2005, i've been 18 billion, charlie indo for 15 billion, reader, frances and jeanne all and hurricane damage. in your view, does the national flood insurance program currently structured work? >> i think it does work. it does help protect consumers from an uninsurable event in the private arcade. the program was created in 1968 was the result created because the private market could not accurately and in suitably underrate the insurance risk. so what was happening was people were completely without flood insurance protection. so is happening in the 60s and 50s as american citizens were being flooded and the only recourse that she had was federal disaster assistance after the fact. so the program was created to have people pay into a program and be prepared for storm and a flood event before it happened. now, it certainly could use improvement. you know, there are critics out there whose fate is is too subsidized by the federal gove
, in hurricane katrina in 2005, the team of the nypd used a helicopter to lift people who were stranded in their homes by flood water. down on staten island three people now are missing. we know that 14 people have lost their lives on staten island alone at least 54 across the area so far. as we are seeing at ground level and especially from the air, perhaps the worst physical destruction is along the jersey shore. no doubt about that. today as you saw at the top of the broadcast, president obama and new jersey governor chris christie. >> crisis makes unexpected bed fellows. >> i cannot thank the president enough for his concern and compassion for the people of our state. >> president obama returned the fair. favor. >> he has put his heart and soul in making sure that the people of new jersey bounce back better than before. >> obama and christie touring a shelter for residents who lost everything. >>. [ inaudible ] >> fema will be coordinating. >> and walking a neighborhood among the hardest hit. >> among the surprises a president not known for displaying affection showed it this day. >
did getting ready for it. actually, i was -- i sat through katrina. so i kind of have been through a little bit of this before. but this what happened here, i don't think we know the scope oist. >> i think you are right. >> this is why we need the news media to come in. we need fewer of the reporters standing in waist high water and more real reporting real news. what is really going on. >> i have heard that. i don't agree with you. when i see somebody standing there in atlantic city in the middle of the boardwalk in water, the point of him doing that, i believe, and i agree with it, is there anyone mad enough to think that they should be growing out for a stroll walking the dog and looking at that and say it what is wrong with you? >> i was watching it. and my first thought is why is cnn trying to kill ally? what did he do here? >> because it is a dram mastic image at how big this is. >> it does and it doesn't. i mean, if it saves one life isn't it worth it? >> well, yeah, but there is a lot of things that you can do on cnn to save lives. but you can do that on another show. there
health there. you and i have talked a lot about hospitals in the wake of katrina. why do people put the power in the basement? it seems to me the first thing that's going to go in a flood or any kind of, not even a major a storm, but a minor storm, is your basement's going to flood. >> this has been a bit of a technological whack-a-mole here, because we realized after katrina, and even after the blackout of 2003, we had to do something about backup generators in hospital. and so we moved the generators upstairs, but left the fuel pumps down in the basement. so we fixed the initial problem and have a secondary that no one seems to have thought about. >> okay, is that just complete stupidity, or is that, listen, it's financially expensive and people make the gamble, we're not going to invest the money and hope for the best. >> i think in this case, it was not paying attention to all of the details. i think people were well meaning. i don't think there was any sort of gross negligence here, except that somebody forgot an essential detail, in a situation that requires extraordinarily ex
for president bush was of him hugging someone after a natural disaster. you know, the images of katrina, biggest single thing beyond the war in iraq that undermined confidence in president bush's leadership. you cannot get those images out of your head as you watch this stuff. >> except, you know what, katty kay? there is a certain appeal that i think is coming as a relief to people who are tired, who are tired of the vitriol, of the stupidity. and a politician who can work with the other side, isn't that something that in this new age of politics that's appealing? >> it's huge. and i think it's probably almost the overriding priority of whoever gets elected next tuesday is to be able to make this country governable again. and to be able to do that by bringing about a certain amount of cooperation on the things america needs to do between republicans and democrats. we saw it yesterday between chris christie and brearack oba. and it's going to be very interesting to watch today as the campaign trail resumes, whether there's a different tone. i wouldn't be surprised -- we've heard the president us
. but it's brutal. this is our version of katrina. i've been touring the south shore today in my district, and the devastation is enormous. what you're showing on your screen is typical of many areas on long island. right now the county executive is meeting with fema to set up plans as to how the recovery will take place. work is coming in from all over the country to work with lipa, to restore the power, but it's going to be a tough haul. i can say that everything that can be done is being done. over the next several days, you'll see more power being restored. this could go on for another ten days to two weeks. >> are there still people missing? there are a lot of people who chose to ride this storm out. a lot of people who weren't even in areas that were supposed to be at high risk and they're still there. >> yeah. for instance, long beach, which is an island 30,000, 40,000 people on the island. many of them stayed, and i was talking to several people today. and this is just anecdotal. friends of theirs who cannot find their wife or daughters or their sons, cousins, people in homes who
overseas in afghanistan and that have served time with katrina down in new orleans, and they said it doesn't look much different. i would agree with them. even just walking around and having it be dead silent and the hising of natural gas coming out of the ground because of broken mains. we are still as of yesterday, still in search and rescue mode trying to make sure that everybody's out of their house and safe. before the -- they allow people to actually come back. it's a very, very frustrating time, but i can tell you kind of what -- you were talking about with ralph -- clive on the earlier call, the people -- i had the opportunity last night to go to some shelters and talk to some people. they are amazed at the amount of people that are willing to help and total strangers. from the time i was there just -- random citizens just walking into the shelters and donating goods and trying to help their fellow man. it's unfortunate it takes a tragic situation like this to bring the best out of people. host: congressman runyan, what is the best way that the federal government in your view can h
from and they're doing that with huge pumps. some of them deployed after katrina. they're pumping right now i think 700,000 gallons an hour. they hope later by later today they'll be pumping some 2 million gallons an hour. they're attacking this right now. at the same time, they try to push the debris out of their city. >> any idea, jim, how long that will take, that process of pumping it out? >> no. i don't really know how long it will take. because, you know, they're going to pump basements out. there's a high school near here. pumping that basement out. their gymnasium and back in to it so all the water's going to come out of the homes in to those lakes even as those lakes are being emptied and going to empty them all the way down to the bottom. it's certainly going to be a process. a weeklong process but at the same time the long-term outlook is here to rebuild and rebuild by memorial day, before the beginning of summer 2013. and they know that's even a tall order. may seem like seven months away, eight months away, no, there's so much work to be done in rebuilding it takes every bi
you compare this to other events you've seen? >> let's see. katrina -- or irene last year this area also flooded. but not nearly as bad as this. the clean up, it's pretty much drained within a day or so. and lost no electricity last year. this one we were -- you know, we don't know the epa. >> reporter: dan, thanks very much. good luck to you. wolf, there's one resident, one business owner here determine today recover. others here have an amazing sense of community spirit. these are all community volunteers doing all this work largely responsible for the clearing of the streets. as i mentioned, just a couple hours ago this water was up to my knees, up to the knees of these volunteers who waded out here in some very, very unhealthy and almost dangerous water because it has so much sewage and chemicals and garbage in it. >> brian, we'll get back to you in hoboken, new jersey. let's head back to manhattan. we've re-established our contact with dr. sanjay gupta. he's at bellevue hospital, sanjay, 700 patients now need to be evacuated because they've lost power, emergency generators at b
. look, people warned katrina that new orleans needed to be able to withstand a category 5. they didn't design the levees to withstand it and we see what happened. now we see the same thing with sandy. i think the hope has to be that sandy isn't short for cassandra and that it's another warning that we ignore. absolutely people now have seen that you can in fact have the worst-case scenario, which was a flooding of the lower manhattan and i think any city along the eastern sea board has ask-to-ask themselves what would happen if hurricane sandy hit us? >> suarez: well, how do we price risk, then, into the decisions we make both publicly and privately. should there with b places in new jersey, in new york, where insurance companies say "we don't want to pay for you to rebuild right there"? where the cost of doing so becomes higher and maybe prohibitive for some people? >> there probably should be, yes, because the alternative is we keep enticing people to place more and more of their value, more and more of their wealth in fragile co-systems or fragile areas of the environment if we do
power has already been restored but it's brutal. this is really our version of katrina. i'm not saying any two tragedies are alike but i've been touring the south shore today in my district and massapequa, lindenhurst, what you're showing is typical of many areas on long isla island. fema the county executives are meeting with fema to set up compact plans as to how that recovery will take place. workers are coming in from all over the country to restore the power but it's a tough haul. i don't want to give anyone any false hope. everything that can be done is being done. i think over the next several days you will see more power being restored but this could go on for another ten days to two weeks. >> are there people still missing? what we saw in hoboken, new jersey, 20,000 people are still there, stuck with water beneath their apartments and their homes but there are a lot of people who chose to ride this storm out, a lot of people who weren't in areas that were supposed to be at high risk and they're still there. >> yes, for instance long beach, which is an island probably 34,000 pe
hurricane katrina, and he said new york city is a much more complex problem, because these tunnels are so deep and they are so long, and the path tunnel may be even a little bit luckier if you will, than the subway tunnels, because the subway tunnels, a system that just had its 108th birthday on saturday. one day before hurricane sandy hit, and some of the electrical equipment in these tunnels are so old, they don't know what the effect of saltwater eroding the tunnels. one of the things that struck me, governor cuomo, talking quite strongly yesterday and today about climate change and how climate change has made lower manhattan much more vulnerable to storm surges and made the subway system vulnerable, which is, unfortunately, something that was predicted and predictable. >> well, it's also something -- i was talking to a climate change expert today. it is only going to get worse. we've seen the water rise a foot over the last 100 years, but in the next 100 years, it will rise another two to three feet. for an island like manhattan, that's something we have to contend with. andrea, thank
from the aid given to the victims of hurricane katrina. >> gucci bags and massage parlors and everything you can think of. >> we will hear more from iowa congressman steve king straight ahead. >>> likely target, school's former president, why he could be charged with perjury. >>> plus this -- >> when negative ads and robo calls quit working, the political campaigns show up on doorsteps in ohio. what's it like to be a door-to-door campaign volunteer? newsroom starts now. >>> good morning. thank you so much for joining us. i'm carol costello. new death toll and deepening concern from hurricane sandy three days after the storm washed ashore. here is a time lapsed video. that's what you're look iing at right now. watch the right side of your screen as the new york city skyline is plunged into darkness. there it goes. today, nearly 5 million homes and businesses are still without power. the death toll is inching up again. superstorm blamed for 56 deaths in the united states. half the victims just in new york city. the mayor says he expects that number to rise. officials say it
. joining us now to talk about this is dr. erwin redlenner, he has studied how hospitals handled katrina. he knows everything, really, about disaster preparedness. and doctor, i have to ask you this. we've seen a lot of businesses, big businesses like goldman sachs, big buildings downtown on generator power. they're up and running. why not a hospital? >> well, it's not clear why not a hospital. and one of the problems here is initially, years ago, we had generators in the basements of hospitals, which is obviously something that doesn't really work, because when they get flooded, the generators go out. so they moved the generators up to higher elevations, but leave the fuel pumps down in the basement. and those fuel pumps are susceptible to flooding. it's just a detail that turns the out to be extraordinarily important when the time comes to actually use those generators. >> seems like a crucial detail right now. the president of new york city is helping the hospital corporation, asked by cnn's erin burnett last night, if hospitals were ready for this. let's listen to his answer. >> well, th
that are working on it. some of it were deployed during katrina. they're pumping hundreds of thousands of gallons out of two lakes that are inside, and, therefore, draining that interior bowl. the word today is really reconstruction, and they are tackling this aggressively. tell me where all the sand goes. do you move the sand and recreate the beach? how does that work? >> well, there's a huge problem mayor matt dougherty said if there's any wood in there with nails in it or something, they literally will have to sift this sand with they are bare hands. people will have to go lou it to determine that it's safe. there's still a lot of work to be done, but, yes, they're shifrting it here on ocean avenue from one side to the other. they're going to push the debris in the town to ocean avenue then and then truck it all away. that's the strategy that they have. the mayor said it's the aggressive approach that he heard governor christie -- chris christie wanted him to take, and that was do whatever it takes to get the job done. >> do they have enough people to get the job done? are they bringing in wor
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)

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